Hot off the press: New paper in Acta Biomaterialia!

New paper Sciatic nerve regeneration after traumatic injury using magnetic targeted adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells has been published in the journal Acta Biomaterialia.

The paper is a result of the collaboration between Anna Roig and Marcela B. Fernández van Raap, a long-time collaborator of the N&N Group from the Instituto de Fisica de La Plata (Argentina), and coworkers.

Abstract:

Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries constitute a huge concern to public health. Nerve damage leads to a decrease or even loss of mobility of the innervated area. Adult stem cell therapies have shown some encouraging results and have been identified as promising treatment candidates for nerve regeneration. A major obstacle to that approach is securing a sufficient number of cells at the injured site to produce measurable therapeutic effects. The present work tackles this issue and demonstrates enhanced nerve regeneration ability promoted by magnetic targeted cell therapy in an in vivo Wallerian degeneration model. To this end, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSC) were loaded with citric acid coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), systemically transplanted and magnetically recruited to the injured sciatic nerve. AdMSC arrival to the injured nerve was significantly increased using magnetic targeting and their beneficial effects surpassed the regenerative properties of the stand-alone cell therapy. AdMSC-SPIONs group showed a partially conserved nerve structure with many intact myelinated axons. Also, a very remarkable restoration in myelin basic protein organization, indicative of remyelination, was observed. This resulted in an improvement in nerve conduction, demonstrating functional recovery. In summary, our results demonstrate that magnetically assisted delivery of AdMSC, using a non-invasive and non-traumatic method, is a highly promising strategy to promote cell recruitment and sciatic nerve regeneration after traumatic injury. Last but not least, our results validate magnetic targeting in vivo exceeding previous reports in less complex models through cell magnetic targeting in vitro and ex vivo.

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Acta Biomaterialia, Anna Roig, magnetic, Marcela B. Fernández, mesenchymal stem cells, new paper